Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/246
Title: THE ETHICAL DILEMA OF INDIGENOIUS ARCHITECTURE IN AFRICA.
Authors: Aniekwu, Nathaniel Anny
Issue Date: 1986
Publisher: Journal of Tropical Architecture
Series/Report no.: 3;2
Abstract: Almost 5000 years after the first record of conscious architecture was established in Africa, neither Africa nor any country in that continent is considered to have architecture indigenous to her. This foremost architecture had no precedent anywhere in the world and gave the world its two most popular modern structural systems. The actuated (arched) and the trabeated (post and beam) systems. This situation is further complicated by the very acquiescent acknowledgment of this trend by scholar, to the point that it is axiomatic for Africa not to be identified with any architectural style or even history. Clearly this dilemma is attributable to the criteria in use for the judgment and classification of architectural works. This paper identifies a fundamental fault in the basic conception of these criteria and contends that all works done for a people by a member of that group, whether in borrowed style, material or technology should constitute the core of the groups indigenous work, as long as it satisfies the design requirements of the environment in question.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/246
Appears in Collections:Abstracts

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