Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1356
Title: HOSPITAL IN DOOR AIRBORNE MICROFLORA IN PRIVATE AND GOVERNMENT OWNED HOSPITALS IN BEN IN CITY, NIGERIA.
Authors: Ekhaise, Fred. Osaro
Ighosewe, Okioghene Ufuoma
Ajakpovi, Ochuko Dorcas.
Keywords: Airborne microflora
bacteria
bioaerosols
fungi
hospital
time and ward.
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: Journal of Nigerian Environmental Society (JNES).
Series/Report no.: 4(3);110 – 119
Abstract: The level of airborne microbial load of hospitals indoor is unknown in Benin City, Nigeria. A study of the quality and quantity of airborne microflora in two major hospitals, the Faith Medical Center and Central Hospital in Benin City was carried out to establish standard for future reference. Samples were collected using the settled plate techniques for the enumeration of bacterial and fungal isolates. Each day, the air samples were collected thrice: in the morning between 10am and 11am, in the afternoon between 12noon and 2pm and in the evening between 5pm and 6pm. The total heterotrophic microbial population of the five different wards studied from the two hospitals varied from ward to ward. The highest bacterial population was recorded in the evening between 5pm and 6pm compared to the morning and afternoon, ranging from 15cfu m3 to 47cfu/m3 in the Faith Medical Hospital and 17 cfu/m3 to 52cfu/m3 in the central Hospital, with the children wardrecording the highest bacterial counts of 47 cfu/m3 and 52cfu/m3 in the Faith Medical Center and Central Hospital respectively. The concentration of fungal population in air of the five different wards in the two hospitals studied was recorded high in the evening, with values ranging from 10 cfu/m3 to 53 cfu/m3. At the three different times of the study, the male, female, children wards and bacteriological laboratory were observed to record high fungal population in the Faith Medical Center and the Central Hospital. The microbial isolates characterised and identified include six bacterial and four fungal genera, among which are bacterial isolates: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella aerogenes and fungal isolates include Aspergillus, Penicillum, Mucor and Fusarium. The degree of frequency of microbial distribution was high in the bacteriological laboratory and female ward and lowest in the operating room (Theater).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/1356
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